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Astronomical League Imaging Programs

The links below each program image will take you to the AL page for that program. My images are found by following the "Image Gallery" links.
Astronomical League Bright Nebula Program
Bright Nebula
Completed 2015
The Bright Nebula Observing Program is a work in progress for the AL. The initial list included many errors, some of which went uncorrected in its second iteration. I've made a corrected list in the form of a PDF that you can download.

You're required to image 100 objects from the list. Combine the facts that there are only 150+ nebulae on the list, some aren't available to northern imagers, and quite a few are in the "barely there" category, and you have a challenging task.

IMAGE GALLERY


Astronomical League Planetary Nebula Program pin
Globular Clusters
In Progress

The Globular Cluster Program is an good way to learn about the globular clusters that orbit the Milky Way and other galaxies.

The imaging demands are fairly light compared to some other programs; only 50 globulars need be imaged, and one good image of M31 can give you over half of what you need.

 

IMAGE GALLERY


Astronomical League Planetary Nebula Program pin
Planetary Nebula
In Progress
The Planetary Nebula Program will test your imaging skills at long focal lengths. Many of the objects are small, but their saving characteristic is that most have a surface brightness that doesn't require a long exposure. But be aware that many of the objects also have extended, much fainter envelopes that won't show up without some effort.

This is a list of objects with not a lot of "wiggle room," my name for the number of objects you can skip on your way to the required 90 images.

Imaging PNs gives you choices. Most are dominated either by hydrogen alpha or oxygen 3 emissions, so single- or double-channel narrowband is useful.

IMAGE GALLERY


Astronomical League Arp Peculiar Galaxy Program pin
Arp Peculiar Galaxy
In Progress
Arp galaxies are much like the planetary nebulae: Small and relatively bright.

Many of these are members of clusters of galaxies.

My impression is that this is an easy program to complete. Arps are well cataloged and fairly easy to find, and you only need to image about 1/3 of their members. Almost 1/3 of what you need can be found in Ursa Major alone, which is very convenient for northern observers. Tiny galaxies also lend themselves to monochrome imaging, so you can collect quite a few in a single evening.

IMAGE GALLERY